Tuesday, 13 December 2011

Drivers taking to Twitter to warn about roadside checks


Drivers taking to Twitter to warn about roadside checks
Andy Johnson | CTVNews.ca Tue Dec 13, 06:16 PM
Drivers are increasingly taking to Twitter to warn fellow motorists, who may have been sipping some spiked eggnog before getting behind the wheel, about the location of police roadside checks.
Drivers are increasingly taking to Twitter to warn fellow motorists, who may have been sipping some spiked eggnog before getting behind the wheel, about the location of police roadside checks.
Calgary Police Chief Rick Hanson complained about the phenomenon this week, saying he is astounded that anyone would want to assist an impaired driver who is effectively endangering lives by getting behind the wheel.

Kevin Brookwell, a spokesperson for the Calgary police, told CTVNews.ca there's little police can do about the practice, comparing it to flashing headlights to warn other drivers about an upcoming speedtrap -- something drivers have done for years.
But he urged motorists to think about the potential repercussions of their actions, questioning why they would want to assist impaired drivers.
"You can't help but look into the future and you happen to be someone who's tweeting a Checkstop location and that's enough for someone to make a left at the next corner, miss a Checkstop, go down to the next intersection and blow through a red light and kill an entire family coming home. What have you really accomplished?" asked Brookwell.
The Calgary Police Service isn't the first to complain about the phenomenon.
In London, Ont. this week police also complained, saying those who tweet about Reduce Impaired Driver Everywhere (RIDE) checkpoints should consider how they would feel if a loved one was killed by a drunk driver.
Police in Chatham, Ont. offered a similar message in local media reports.
A search of Twitter showed this post from @ImJoeyLemosBro of Toronto, who tweeted about the London area:
"Ride program at the valleywood exit for the 410, be careful stoners and pounders."
Another Twitter user from London slammed those who use the social media service to help tipsy drivers avoid checkpoints.
"On a semi-related note, if you tweet out the specific location of a RIDE program. You're an idiot. Please think before you tweet," said @dbillson.
Despite the police backlash, Brookfield acknowledged that some good can come from the simple fact that word is spreading that police are out there and on the alert for impaired drivers.
"If you're at a bar or you're a friend of a friend of a friend and you happen to see this tweet... then you know we're out there and you've been drinking, it may be enough to make you think I'm going to find an alternative way home, a designated driver, a taxi, whatever. So as a promotional education tool it has that benefit."
He also said checkpoints are frequently moved from location to location over the course of an evening, and a Twitter warning may not be accurate for long.

1 comment:

  1. I found your site very beautiful and distinguished too. Thank you for your good work and continue.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...